Can Smoking Marijuana Make Me Crazy?

One of the eyebrow-raising theories floating around is that marijuana can make you go nuts. How true is that?

The effects of using marijuana are typically influenced by factors like age, frequency of use, health status, and dosage.

You see, if schizophrenia runs in your family, there’s a good chance that you’ll too develop this condition.

And so, when symptoms first appear, marijuana can magnify these symptoms, making you wrongly assume that it caused the illness.

Federal laws may prohibit cannabis but it is still one of the most popular substances in America.

You see, crack and meth appeal to low-income folks, but cannabis is favored by both the high and low in society.

Many high-profile personalities have broadcasted their love for cannabis and confessed that it levels up their energy and keeps them in a creative space.

Can Marijuana Make Me Lose Touch With Reality?

One of the mental illnesses that cause people to lose touch with reality is psychosis. This is where your mind has a distorted way of interpreting information.

If you have this condition, you could be walking along a dark footpath, and your mind conjures up ghosts that taunt you, or you could look at a goat and think it a lion.

There’s no evidence that using marijuana predisposes a person to psychosis.

If you seem to not be in touch with reality, and you use marijuana, trust that the symptoms would still be there if you hadn’t used cannabis.

To avoid any complications make sure to buy quality buds from reputable dispensaries or online stores.

Losing touch with reality is a serious condition that needs to be attended to before any damage is done.

Marijuana for Mental Illness

Cannabis can help with symptoms of several mental conditions like anxiety, panic disorders, PTSD, and OCD.

Mental illness usually drives the victim into developing self-inhibiting habits that hijack their important life goals.

Marijuana is great for cutting out impulsivity, attaining a stable emotional state, and solving problems, all of which are critical in eliminating a mental illness.

Before you start using marijuana, you need to consider some factors, though.

Your age: if you are 18 and below, your organs may not be fully developed, and taking cannabis might be risky against your delicate organs.

Your health status: you must also not ignore your current health status. If you have a pre-existing health problem, it may mean ingesting more cannabis.

Dosage: the amount of cannabis you consume ultimately determines the level of effects. If you are new to it, make sure to start with a small dosage.

What are the Challenges of Using Marijuana?

Smoking marijuana will get you high, but it doesn’t predispose you to psychosis. Is that to mean that cannabis has no dark side? By no means!

Develop an addiction: ya know, marijuana is packing THC, the compound with addictive properties. Constant use of marijuana can have you develop an addiction.

Distorted thoughts: with some strains, you may develop foggy thoughts, but this usually happens to novice users. As you get used to it, that side effect fades away.

Hungry: some marijuana strains increase both metabolism and appetite, making you eat than you normally would.

Is Marijuana a Risk Factor for Later Schizophrenia?

Some researchers submitted that using marijuana early in life can set you up for schizophrenia in your later years.

There’s not enough evidence to support this statement, but it’s something that cannot be ignored.

And so, if you are younger than 18 years, you might want to hold back on using marijuana until you are old enough.

The reason is simple: your brain is still developing, but using marijuana might affect the growth tangent.

Also, we cannot stress enough the need of buying quality marijuana from reputable dispensaries.

You see, low-grade bungle weed can mess you up in ways you never thought.

Marijuana is favored by all kinds of people, and it’s not like they have developed any mental disorders.

Saying that marijuana makes people crazy is inaccurate.

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